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Official Bus Tour Routes

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Find the routes of the official Madrid City Tour. See the stops, create your own travel plan and Hop On and Off with a single ticket.

4 routes in Madrid City Tour
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Route 1 Historic Madrid

Discover the most historic and emblematic city of Madrid. This tour will take you to explore the heart of Madrid, walk along the magnificent Paseo del Prado, and admire the architectural jewels of the Hapsburg royalty.

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10:00 - 18:00
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20-30 Min
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16 stops
icon itinerary
1:30 hours
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Route 1 Historic Madrid Extended

Discover the most historic and emblematic city of Madrid. This tour will take you to explore the heart of Madrid, walk along the magnificent Paseo del Prado, and admire the architectural jewels of the Hapsburg royalty.

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10:05 | 14:30
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Two departures
icon stops
22 stops
icon itinerary
1:45 hours
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Route 2 Modern Madrid

Discover the most contemporary architectural works of the capital in an itinerary that will take you to the Reina Sofia Museum, the tower of Colon, and other.

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10:00 - 18:00
icon interval
20-30 Min
icon stops
16 stops
icon itinerary
1:10 hours
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Route 2 Modern Madrid Extended

Visit all the tourist attractions of Route 2 Modern Madrid as well as other essential monuments: the imposing KIO Towers, the grandiose Plaza de Toros de Las Ventas, the modern Palacio de Deportes, the palatial Casón del Buen Retiro and the emblematic Atocha Station.

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12:30 | 16:30
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Two departures
icon stops
20 stops
icon itinerary
1:45 hours

Museo del Prado’s walls are lined with masterpieces from the Spanish, Italian and Flemish schools, including Velázquez’s ‘Las Meninas’ and Goya’s ‘Third of May, 1808’. The Museo del Prado opened for the first time on November 10, 1819. Thanks to the determination of Isabella of Braganza, married to King Ferdinand VII, the building that Juan de Villanueva had initially designed to house the Natural History Cabinet finally accommodated an important part of the royal collections. Years of private donations and acquisitions enlarged the museum's collection

This is one of the most well-known monuments in Madrid. Built between 1769 and 1778 under the orders of King Carlos III, it was designed by Francisco Sabatini and erected as a triumphal arch to celebrate the arrival of the monarch at the capital. The granite gate is 19.5 metres tall and is elegant and well-proportioned. The façade features a number of decorative elements with groups of sculptures, capitals, reliefs and masks, among others.

Salamanca is one of the 21 districts that form the city of Madrid. Don José de Salamanca y Mayol, Marquis of Salamanca, gave his name to the area because of his involvement in the district’s project in 1860. Nowadays, the Salamanca district is one of the wealthiest areas in Madrid and some of its streets, such as Goya or Serrano, are part of the most expensive streets in Spain. Here you can find the Palacio de los Deportes de Madrid, the Viviendas Velázquez, the Plaza de Toros de Las Ventas and the Jardines del Descubrimiento.

The statue in honour of Cristopher Columbus was built between 1881 and 1885, to celebrate the marriage between Alfonso XII and María de las Mercedes from Orleáns. This monument is outstanding due to its perfect incorporation into the square in which is it situated, with a beautiful grassy area, ponds and a large waterfall. Alongside Plaza de Colón you will find the majestic Biblioteca Nacional building. Special mention should be made of its broad exterior staircase and its main façade with a Corinthian style.

This is one of the liveliest, best-known and most beautiful squares in Madrid, and is home to such emblematic monuments as the Fuente de Cibeles and Palacio de Cibeles. The Fuente de Cibeles, the symbol of Madrid, stands in the middle of the square. Goddess of nature and protector of the town, this sculpture was designed by Ventura Rodríguez in 1777. Also in this square is the Palacio de Cibeles (today the site of the City Hall) which also houses the cultural space known as CentroCentro and the Galería de Cristal.

Gran Vía is one of the most important and symbolic arteries of downtown Madrid, and in few places will you experience the hustle and bustle of this busy street. Lined with theatres, hotels, restaurants and cafés, thousands of residents and tourists stream along its pavements every day. Being located in the busy heart of Madrid it also has many souvenir shops, selling typical craft items, and traditional goods such as lace, mantilla shawls and fans.

Not translated

Madrid's Gran Via was planned as a recreational and shopping area. The segment between San Luis and Plaza de Callao features antique buildings housing fashion stores from internationally renowned brands.

Plaza de España is a large square, and popular tourist destination, located in central Madrid. In the centre of the plaza is a monument to Spanish novelist, poet and playwright Miguel de Cervantes. The tower portion of the monument includes a stone sculpture of Cervantes, which overlooks bronze sculptures of Don Quijote and Sancho Panza. Flanking the Plaza de España we find two emblematic buildings of the city: the Madrid Tower and the Edificio España, which constitute one of the most interesting architectural areas of Madrid.

This construction dates from the 2nd century BC, and, after centuries on Egyptian soil, was brought to Spain as a gift from Egypt. It arrived in Madrid in 1968, and can be seen in Parque de la Montaña, very close to Plaza de España. The monument is surrounded by beautiful gardens with a fountain, and is Madrid's oldest. It has a hall, several chapels and a terrace on the upper floor, and conserves its original decoration inside.

Admire one of the few monumental gates that remain in Madrid. A work of art by the architect Francesco Sabatini, to whom we also own the Puerta de Alcalá. Commissioned by Carlos III. Due to the growth of the city, the gate was dismantled in 1890 and rebuilt again in 1995 to return this monument to the city.

The gate is today located in a privileged place. Very close to Campo del Moro, the Royal Palace and the Parque del Oeste.

Nineteen metres tall and opened in 1827, this is the most recent monumental gate built in Madrid. The impressive granite construction was started in 1812 under the orders of Joseph Bonaparte. One year later, after the withdrawal of the French troops from Spain, the project continued and Puerta de Toledo became the site to receive Fernando VII, as represented on one of the friezes. The monument consists of a central semi-circular arch, two lintelled gates and a decoration formed by columns.

The Basílica de San Francisco el Grande, a Classicist building from the 18th century, was built on an old convent which legend says was founded by San Francisco de Assisi in the 13th century. This new church was built by King Charles III of Spain; it was originally designed by Francisco Cabezas in 1761 and completed by Francisco Sabatini and Miguel Fernández in 1784. It has a sober, vertical façade and the most notable feature of the building’s exterior is its huge dome, 33 metres in diameter.

Throughout its history it has had different names until 1848 when it was called Colegiata Street, which joins Toledo Street with Tirso de Molina Square.
The current name refers to the Colegiata de San Isidro. The Colegiata de San Isidro is a 17th century Catholic temple that houses the remains of the patron saint of the city and his wife. It was the Cathedral of Madrid until the Almudena Cathedral was consecrated in 1992.

At this stop very close to it you can find the Plaza Mayor.

The Calle de Atocha runs from the Plaza de la Provincia to the Plaza del Emperador Carlos V. The Calle de Atocha has been one of the main axes of Madrid throughout its history. Culture is breathed in every corner of the Atocha area, not only in the Cuesta de Moyano, but also in the Barrio de Las Letras, the area of Madrid where the great writers of the Golden Age of Spanish Literature lived. In this area you will find restaurants and bars ranging from the most traditional to the most avant-garde.

The Jardín Botánico was founded by Ferdinand VI in 1755, and was designed by the architects Francisco Sabatini and Juan de Villanueva. Some of its most interesting features include the gates known as the Puerta de Murillo, and the Puerta del Rey, and the Pabellón Villanueva. Its lovely neo-Gothic layout and its location in the centre of the city make it one of the most distinctive botanical gardens in Europe. From here you can go to Museo del Prado which holds numerous masterpieces by El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Bosch, Titian, Van Dyck and Rembrandt.

Museo del Prado’s walls are lined with masterpieces from the Spanish, Italian and Flemish schools, including Velázquez’s ‘Las Meninas’ and Goya’s ‘Third of May, 1808’. The Museo del Prado opened for the first time on November 10, 1819. Thanks to the determination of Isabella of Braganza, married to King Ferdinand VII, the building that Juan de Villanueva had initially designed to house the Natural History Cabinet finally accommodated an important part of the royal collections. Years of private donations and acquisitions enlarged the museum's collection

This is one of the most well-known monuments in Madrid. Built between 1769 and 1778 under the orders of King Carlos III, it was designed by Francisco Sabatini and erected as a triumphal arch to celebrate the arrival of the monarch at the capital. The granite gate is 19.5 metres tall and is elegant and well-proportioned. The façade features a number of decorative elements with groups of sculptures, capitals, reliefs and masks, among others.

Salamanca is one of the 21 districts that form the city of Madrid. Don José de Salamanca y Mayol, Marquis of Salamanca, gave his name to the area because of his involvement in the district’s project in 1860. Nowadays, the Salamanca district is one of the wealthiest areas in Madrid and some of its streets, such as Goya or Serrano, are part of the most expensive streets in Spain. Here you can find the Palacio de los Deportes de Madrid, the Viviendas Velázquez, the Plaza de Toros de Las Ventas and the Jardines del Descubrimiento.

The statue in honour of Cristopher Columbus was built between 1881 and 1885, to celebrate the marriage between Alfonso XII and María de las Mercedes from Orleáns. This monument is outstanding due to its perfect incorporation into the square in which is it situated, with a beautiful grassy area, ponds and a large waterfall. Alongside Plaza de Colón you will find the majestic Biblioteca Nacional building. Special mention should be made of its broad exterior staircase and its main façade with a Corinthian style.

This is one of the liveliest, best-known and most beautiful squares in Madrid, and is home to such emblematic monuments as the Fuente de Cibeles and Palacio de Cibeles. The Fuente de Cibeles, the symbol of Madrid, stands in the middle of the square. Goddess of nature and protector of the town, this sculpture was designed by Ventura Rodríguez in 1777. Also in this square is the Palacio de Cibeles (today the site of the City Hall) which also houses the cultural space known as CentroCentro and the Galería de Cristal.

Gran Vía is one of the most important and symbolic arteries of downtown Madrid, and in few places will you experience the hustle and bustle of this busy street. Lined with theatres, hotels, restaurants and cafés, thousands of residents and tourists stream along its pavements every day. Being located in the busy heart of Madrid it also has many souvenir shops, selling typical craft items, and traditional goods such as lace, mantilla shawls and fans.

Not translated

Madrid's Gran Via was planned as a recreational and shopping area. The segment between San Luis and Plaza de Callao features antique buildings housing fashion stores from internationally renowned brands.

Plaza de España is a large square, and popular tourist destination, located in central Madrid. In the centre of the plaza is a monument to Spanish novelist, poet and playwright Miguel de Cervantes. The tower portion of the monument includes a stone sculpture of Cervantes, which overlooks bronze sculptures of Don Quijote and Sancho Panza. Flanking the Plaza de España we find two emblematic buildings of the city: the Madrid Tower and the Edificio España, which constitute one of the most interesting architectural areas of Madrid.

The crowded street, named for 18th century Princess Maria Isabel Francisca de Asis, is one of Madrid’s busiest shopping districts and as a continuation of Gran Vía. It is home to many of the high-street chains, such as Zara, Mango, Blanco, Uterqüe, Camper, Massimo Dutti, etc. Many small shoe shops and specialist accessories boutiques are also to be found here. The Palacio de Liria occupies 20-22 calle Princesa and belongs to the most titled family in Europe, the House of Alba.

The Plaza de la Moncloa is in the west of Madrid. From there you can see buildings in the neo-Herrerian style built during Franco's time, such as the Headquarters of the Air Force, the Arch of Victory and the Moncloa Lighthouse. The Arch of Victory was commissioned by Franco to commemorate the victory in the Spanish Civil War. A bit further on is the Moncloa Lighthouse, a lighting and communications tower for the Madrid Town Hall.

The Madrid Teleférico offers residents of Madrid and tourists the chance to fly over the city and gaze from the air at the most historical as well as the greenest parts of Madrid. Monumental buildings, highways, parks and gardens are at your feet, offering one of the most evocative views of the city. The system has 80 cabins that travel the 1.5 miles separating the Estación de Rosales and Estación de Casa de Campo in eleven minutes.

This construction dates from the 2nd century BC, and, after centuries on Egyptian soil, was brought to Spain as a gift from Egypt. It arrived in Madrid in 1968, and can be seen in Parque de la Montaña, very close to Plaza de España. The monument is surrounded by beautiful gardens with a fountain, and is Madrid's oldest. It has a hall, several chapels and a terrace on the upper floor, and conserves its original decoration inside.

Admire one of the few monumental gates that remain in Madrid. A work of art by the architect Francesco Sabatini, to whom we also own the Puerta de Alcalá. Commissioned by Carlos III. Due to the growth of the city, the gate was dismantled in 1890 and rebuilt again in 1995 to return this monument to the city.

The gate is today located in a privileged place. Very close to Campo del Moro, the Royal Palace and the Parque del Oeste.

This is the oldest bridge in Madrid and it crosses over the Manzanares River on the way from Segovia, one of the main access points to the capital. Its construction began in 1574, according to the Provision of Philip II, by Construction Foreman Gaspar de Vega. Upon the architect’s death in 1577, with the bridge only at its foundations, Juan de Herrera took charge of the project and created new designs. The bridge is formed by nine semi-circular arches and built with granite ashlars

Here are two of the oldest bridges in Madrid; the Puente de Segovia which was built in granite with nine semi-circular arches; and the Puente de Toledo which was built in granite by the orders of Phillip IV and also with nine arches. Moreover, Madrid Rio is a huge recreational and cultural area both for its landmarks and leisure facilities and the culture it houses, and for being a reference point from which to contemplate and come into contact with monumental Madrid.

The present bridge was built on the site of a former bridge, destroyed by floods. Built in the 18th century by Pedro de Ribera. Made up of nine semi-circular arches and built of granite ashlar stone. Here you can find the Puerta de Toledo, the most recent monumental gate built in Madrid in 1827. The monument consists of a central semi-circular arch, two lintelled gates and a decoration formed by columns, with a set of sculptures high up and featuring the city’s coat of arms.

Nineteen metres tall and opened in 1827, this is the most recent monumental gate built in Madrid. The impressive granite construction was started in 1812 under the orders of Joseph Bonaparte. One year later, after the withdrawal of the French troops from Spain, the project continued and Puerta de Toledo became the site to receive Fernando VII, as represented on one of the friezes. The monument consists of a central semi-circular arch, two lintelled gates and a decoration formed by columns.

The Basílica de San Francisco el Grande, a Classicist building from the 18th century, was built on an old convent which legend says was founded by San Francisco de Assisi in the 13th century. This new church was built by King Charles III of Spain; it was originally designed by Francisco Cabezas in 1761 and completed by Francisco Sabatini and Miguel Fernández in 1784. It has a sober, vertical façade and the most notable feature of the building’s exterior is its huge dome, 33 metres in diameter.

Throughout its history it has had different names until 1848 when it was called Colegiata Street, which joins Toledo Street with Tirso de Molina Square.
The current name refers to the Colegiata de San Isidro. The Colegiata de San Isidro is a 17th century Catholic temple that houses the remains of the patron saint of the city and his wife. It was the Cathedral of Madrid until the Almudena Cathedral was consecrated in 1992.

At this stop very close to it you can find the Plaza Mayor.

The Calle de Atocha runs from the Plaza de la Provincia to the Plaza del Emperador Carlos V. The Calle de Atocha has been one of the main axes of Madrid throughout its history. Culture is breathed in every corner of the Atocha area, not only in the Cuesta de Moyano, but also in the Barrio de Las Letras, the area of Madrid where the great writers of the Golden Age of Spanish Literature lived. In this area you will find restaurants and bars ranging from the most traditional to the most avant-garde.

The Jardín Botánico was founded by Ferdinand VI in 1755, and was designed by the architects Francisco Sabatini and Juan de Villanueva. Some of its most interesting features include the gates known as the Puerta de Murillo, and the Puerta del Rey, and the Pabellón Villanueva. Its lovely neo-Gothic layout and its location in the centre of the city make it one of the most distinctive botanical gardens in Europe. From here you can go to Museo del Prado which holds numerous masterpieces by El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, Bosch, Titian, Van Dyck and Rembrandt.

The Fuente de Neptuno is on Paseo del Prado. Under the orders of King Charles III, Juan Pascual de Mena began to build this marble statue in 1780. In 1786 his disciple José Rodríguez finished off the project. The figure is standing on a chariot, drawn by two sea horses and surrounded by dolphins. Near the Plaza de Neptuno there are many of the city’s symbolic buildings, such as the Palace Hotel, Palacio de Villahermosa, Museo del Prado, the Ritz Hotel, the Congreso de los Diputados and, in the background, San Jerónimo el Real church.

This is one of the liveliest, best-known and most beautiful squares in Madrid, and is home to such emblematic monuments as the Fuente de Cibeles and Palacio de Cibeles. The Fuente de Cibeles, the symbol of Madrid, stands in the middle of the square. Goddess of nature and protector of the town, this sculpture was designed by Ventura Rodríguez in 1777. Also in this square is the Palacio de Cibeles (today the site of the City Hall) which also houses the cultural space known as CentroCentro and the Galería de Cristal.

The statue in honour of Cristopher Columbus was built between 1881 and 1885, to celebrate the marriage between Alfonso XII and María de las Mercedes from Orleáns. This monument is outstanding due to its perfect incorporation into the square in which is it situated, with a beautiful grassy area, ponds and a large waterfall. Alongside Plaza de Colón you will find the majestic Biblioteca Nacional building. Special mention should be made of its broad exterior staircase and its main façade with a Corinthian style.

Here you will find the Museo de Arte Público, the former Museo de Esculturas. Situated under the overpass joining Juan Bravo and Eduardo Dato streets, it has an excellent collection of Spanish abstract sculpture. The purpose of the museum was to recover an urban space for common use, making it a transition, landing, and recreation area, and to bring Spanish abstract art closer to the public. To compensate for the uneven land, the museum is structured over three levels, smoothly descending from Serrano Street to the paseo de la Castellana.